Getting my play produced, #20: checking out distilleries

A walking tour of some distilleries

After spending so much time with numbers and the budget for my last post, I decided to do something fun.

I went for a walk near where I live, and checked out two distilleries. One distillery has two locations, and the other one has one.

So, aside from having a nice walk, I found out some useful things.

Distillery #1 — restaurants along with the distillery

The two locations of the one distillery were both restaurants (one also had the distillery itself). They had lots of customers early on a Friday evening. I’ve heard that restaurants are not ideal places for readings. In any case, maybe a restaurant would rather have readings on an off night, like a Monday or Tuesday.

Distillery #2 — distillery with a tasting room

The second distillery is under construction. One set of doors were open, so I was looking in. A man came out and I struck up a conversation with him. Turned out he was the distiller. He let me come inside and gave me a short tour, and he talked to me about their plans.

He’s going to have a tasting room, which looked like it would be too small to hold many people for reading. But there is a big room for the distilling operations, and maybe a reading could be held in there.

Readings as fundraisers?

He also mentioned that it takes a lot of money to open a distillery. Which got me thinking. Maybe a reading could be a fundraiser. That might be another reason why a distillery would want to have a reading of my play.

What I learned from my walking tour

Distilleries with restaurants may not be good candidates.

Distilleries that are just starting up might be interested in fundraising events.

 

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About playwrightsmuse

Get produced, get published, let your brilliance shine! Follow along as we go through a step-by-step process for getting plays produced with the least amount of heartbreak and wasted postage and printing costs.
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