Money and the Playwright

Have you ever produced one of your plays?

Have you ever paid a theater to produce one of your plays?

Is it right to produce one of your own plays? Is it right to pay a theater to produce one of your plays?

Do you have a different answer for these two questions?

Ken Davenport just discussed this on his blog, in his post Self-producing problem? Try our new and improved mini-enhancement. Someone immediately commented that paying a theater to produce one of your plays is “wrong for so many reasons.”

But really, how is it different from self producing? In both cases, you’re putting up the money to get the play produced. Producing the play yourself is probably more expensive. Doesn’t it seem — dare I say it — cost-effective?

Funnily enough, people debated this same question — heatedly — on Paul Mullen’s blog. Recently. The Inalienable Happy Pursuit of the Living Wage. What is it about money that stirs people’s passions?

Ken Davenport also blogged about vanity productions. He said that we call something a “vanity production” after the fact, when it’s clear that the production sucks. A self produced production that’s really good, that’s not “vanity.”

I produced a reading of one of my plays recently, as you know. It was pay what you will, and I got enough donated to cover the cost of printing scripts. That’s all. The rest came out of my own pocket.

Do you see that as vanity? And I’m really asking.

The way I see it, I want to make my play better. If no one else will do a reading of it, I will.

Advertisements

About playwrightsmuse

Get produced, get published, let your brilliance shine! Follow along as we go through a step-by-step process for getting plays produced with the least amount of heartbreak and wasted postage and printing costs.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s